Austin’s Doomed Experiment | SARC

by Dallas Emerson, Communications Director & Data Analyst

dallas@southaustinrc.org


Austin has decided to launch an experiment with Universal Basic Income (UBI) in partnership with the nonprofit UpTogether. The program, when implemented, will send $1000 per month to 85 low-income individuals in the city.  

This is part of a series of experiments with Universal Basic Income occurring throughout the country.  

And they’re all pointless.  

Let’s set aside the principle and even the theory underlying UBI.  Those are arguments to be taken up when the discussion is whether to implement such a program.  

No, I want to talk about this “experiment,” and its guaranteed unhelpfulness.  

The idea behind running the pilot program is, at first glance, understandable. Rather than unrolling a multi-billion dollar program, we will study a small group of people, and how their lives and behavior is changed by receiving additional income.  

But the results will be easily misunderstood or misinterpreted; indeed, I would go so far as to say that the results will be meaningless

Let’s look at the pilot program again: 85 low-income people receiving $1000/month. That’s not chump change. I would certainly not turn my nose up to that kind of money. And certainly, we can expect that their spending habits would change. Their work habits will likely change.  

And that means nothing when only 85 people are receiving this money.  

However, if every single Austinite, all 950,000 of them, were to receive $1000/month—or about $12 billion dollars a year—we can only guess at the rapid, unprecedented rise in inflation as we poured an additional one billion dollars every month into our economy. Keep in mind, that nothing else will have changed—there will not be more goods being produced or more workers contributing. There will not be higher quality goods.  

We can guess what kind of wild effect this will have on the prices of low-income housing, food, fuel, and childcare in the city.  

They will go up. 

As we have seen on a national scale, subsidizing demand, by sending cash out to consumers, leads to price increases. This is not an argued point. The only question is how much of the inflation can be attributed to government disbursement of funds.  

If the Council agrees to this experiment, they will be putting Austin on a path to receiving information that we know will be misleading. We know that the relatively small disbursement will help these few, chosen families. We also know that these families will be the most likely to suffer from inflation—low-income families are always hit hardest by price increases.  

The Council must exercise prudence and take any result of this futile experiment with skeptical eyes. 

Austin’s Doomed Experiment | SARC

Winter Weather Preparedness

Severe winter weather can be deadly and we want you to be as prepared as possible for the next major storm that will hit the Austin metro area. Below, you will find ways to be prepared. Please take every suggestion seriously. The intention of this article: To ensure you have the soft/hard skills and options … Continue reading Winter Weather Preparedness

The Party of Lawless Disorder | SARC

By Dallas Emerson, SARC Senior Communications Director & Data Analyst

The rule of law is essential in a free society. Law and liberty are not opposed; they go hand in hand. In a lawless world, the powerful do what they wish, regardless of consequences. In a free society, even the rich and powerful can be held accountable.  

In America, there are essentially only two parties—regardless of what my Libertarian friends and Green Party…acquaintances say. Unfortunately, one party is increasingly clear that it opposes the rule of law at every level, from municipalities to the Presidency.  

While neither party is free of malcontentsviolent rule-breakers, or outright corrupt leadership, only the Democratic Party, at the moment, seeks to drive the country further away from the rule of law and brags about it.  

Here at home, in Austin, our Mayor imposed lockdowns and asked us all to stay home—while he vacationed in sunny Cabo. Democratic-aligned council-people gutted police funding, sewing the seeds of a heartbreaking spike in murders. These same councilors buried their heads in the sand about the frightening homeless problem until it became so glaring that it couldn’t be ignored. Their solution? Spend tens of millions of dollars on the problem—to no avail. When the citizens of this city put forward a plan to reverse this problem, the Mayor, and his predictably far-left associates, suddenly found they could take a firm stand—against implementing any kind of common sense law. Even while acknowledging their leadership had failed. When the initiative passed, the Mayor, and his predictably far-left associates, dragged their feet, refusing to do much at all to enforce the new law.  

When Save Austin Now PAC worked to get a new initiative on the ballot, the City Council so badly mangled the language of the measure that the Texas Supreme Court ordered a change.  

And this makes no mention of this city’s illegal “sanctuary” status.  

But the lawlessness continues to higher levels than our Council.  

The Texas Democratic House Caucus fled the state—in direct violation of the law—because they were afraid they might not get what they wanted. They were hailed as heroes by their national counterparts.  

 At the same time, this party opposes any kind of anti-majoritarian institution that doesn’t benefit them; the Senate, the filibuster, the Electoral College, and the Supreme Court come time mind. They even abhor it when state legislators flee to avoid losing a vote—so long as they’re Republican.  

The Democrats rightly bemoan the awful riot on January 6th yet have nothing but kind words for those who looted, vandalized, and murdered during the summer of 2020. They also had nothing to say as far-left demonstrators attempted to burn down a courthouse in Portland—while people were inside. Almost nothing was said about the separatist movement that seized several blocks of Seattle until there were enough murders to force the City Government to step in. The Seattle Councilors found it in their hearts to speak against vandalism. Of their own homes. In Minneapolis, the Council has cut police funding, while boosting their own security staff. Safety for me, but not for thee.  

But it doesn’t stop there.  

In California, the Governor gave orders to shut the state down, but exempted his own winery and did not stop dining out with lobbyists at gourmet restaurants. In Michigan, Governor Whitmer’s husband attempted to use her authority to take his boat out (she claims this was a joke—oh if only that defense worked for the rest of us.). In New York, the third straight Governor has left office under a shadow of doubt and a cloud of corruption. This was a man who said there should be zero tolerance for sexual harassment. His brother, allegedly a journalist, violated his professional standards by actively working on communication strategies with him. 

The last governor of New York to leave with honor and dignity? George Pataki—also the last Republican.  

But it doesn’t stop there.  

The Supreme Court ruled that President Trump’s eviction moratorium was illegal—a decision I believe is completely correct. The CDC has no jurisdiction over anyone’s lease.  

However, that didn’t stop prominent members of the Democratic party from calling on President Biden to directly refuse to abide by the Supreme Court’s ruling and reimpose the moratorium. 

Think about that for a moment. When a judge rules in court, his or her decision is law. Short of the Constitution, there is no higher legal authority in this country than the Supreme Court. Members of the Congress are sworn to uphold the Constitution. As is the President. In this instance, members of the House were violating their Oath of Office by demanding the President violate his.  

And he did.  

Even while admitting his decision was unconstitutional, President Joe Biden, reinstated the eviction moratorium.  

Which, again, is illegal. And, again, everyone was clear on this.  

And Joe Biden won plaudits from his chorus in the media and his co-conspirators in government.  

And then he did it again.  

After having professed for months that the federal government cannot instate a vaccine mandate, President Joe Biden unilaterally declared that all companies of 100 or more staff must ensure all staff are vaccinated.  

And more praise followed.  

To repeat, the President has now twice told us that he can’t do something only to turn around and do it.  

In Democratic politics, this is described as a reversal.  

For the rest of us, it’s a called a confession. 

The Democratic party is completely uninterested in enforcing the law. Our largest, most chaotic cities are dominated by Democratic machines. Our own city, once a beacon of safety, is increasingly dangerous, setting a record for the number of murders this year. The second most dangerous year? 2020.  

Yet they are intensely interested in ruling. President Biden even spoke of getting Governors “out of the way.” As though elected officials are mere obstacles to his rule. 

Lawless rule in other countries would be called corrupt or authoritarian. Here, we call it “progressive.”   

It may seem that this is all too big. I’ve written of several states, numerous cities, governors and presidents.  

But reform start at home. Waves start as ripples. Local elections become national landslides.  

Let’s fight here at home, together. Our city is not too far gone, and I do not believe our nation is either.  

Austin’s Doomed Experiment | SARC

Austin has decided to launch an experiment with Universal Basic Income (UBI) in partnership with the nonprofit UpTogether. The program, when implemented, will send $1000 per month to 85 low-income individuals in the city.

Press Release: Keep Voting | SARC

6:07PM – Austin, TX USA South Austin Republican Club Dallas Emerson, Communications Director & Data Analyst dallas@southaustinrc.org Keep Voting Former President Donald Trump released the following statement yesterday, October 13th, 2021:   This message has been received as a threat to the Republican Party; somehow to address the alleged fraud of the 2020 election.   There are … Continue reading Press Release: Keep Voting | SARC

South Austin News | SARC

“People who live in South Austin and use Stassney Lane will soon have safer and more convenient ways to cross the street or get to a public transit stop.” @KVUE

On May 1st a Change In Course Must Be Made | SARC

By Dallas Emerson, SARC Deputy Communications Director SARC

The City Council of Austin has failed to address homelessness in the city.  

Think that’s too harsh? Mayor Adler agrees

Don’t misunderstand, he doesn’t have a plan, and doesn’t want to reinstate the camping ban. He doesn’t really have any suggestions. Honestly, it feels a bit like he’s phoning it in at this time, given that can’t run for reelection.  

In June 2019, the Council legalized public camping, stating that the goal was to make the homeless more visible. They got what they wished. You can’t walk downtown without seeing encampments on many streets. You can’t drive along MoPac without seeing tent cities that remind someone of pictures from The Great Depression.  

Many of these encampents leaving people feeling unsafe. And for a good reason, according the Austin Police Chief, who noted a “growing crime trend” 

Despite achieving the goal of increased visibility, the number of homeless per capita hasn’t changed, according to Ending Community Homelessness Coalition (ECHO). If anything, it has gone up. And the number of available shelter beds has actually decreased while the city focuses on developing transitional housing.  

But if the city is changing tactics, why does the situation feel like its getting worse?  

The city allocated about $70,000,000 last year to help provide home and shelters for the homeless. As of December, $30,000,000 was left unspent. Untouched. Unused.  

Frankly, it seems that for some council members, running for Mayor is more important. Defunding the police is a higher priority. Giving the Mayor greater authority over legislations matters more.  

Meanwhile, our city suffers higher crime rates and infrastructure damage as a result of the 10-1 progressive dominated council.  

But laws will not fix the homeless issue.  

This may be a failure of our city’s culture. Certainly, our churches should feel indicted. The presence of large numbers of homeless suggests that something isn’t working. Perhaps we are not charitable enough. Perhaps we are not active enough in helping those in need.  

But it isn’t civil society on the ballot May 1st. We all must decide for ourselves how we will better help our neighbors.  

In the meantime, we must tell the Council that we agree with the Mayor. This hands-off approach has been a failure. Our city is less healthy and less safe than before their June 2019 decision.  

Moving forward I would hope that the city will actually get down to brass tacks and do the hard work of finding solutions to these problems, not merely treating our city as a laboratory for social theory. Allowing people to live—and die—on the streets hasn’t worked. These people need help, not a blind eye. 

I have participated in cleaning up after a camp behind a local VFW was abandoned. It was horrifying. Human waste, garbage, and rotting food were piled high. No one should live in these conditions, and it is a miracle that Austin hasn’t seen an outbreak of avoidable diseases like some of California’s major cities in the past years. 

For the sake of our city, vote yes on Proposition B. Helping the homeless doesn’t end there, but it is how we as citizens can alert our government to what they don’t want to acknowledge—a change in course must be made.  

Gov. Abbott Response to Austin Police Defunding | SARC

Austin city council has voted to defund the Austin Police Department and move funds to “social programs.” Does that make you feel safe? Does this make you want to move to Austin with your family? Check out the details in this article to come to your own conclusion. But, we are confident that you won’t be optimistic about the leadership in Austin by the end…

Gov. Greg Abbott and top Texas leaders announced Tuesday that they will push for legislation next year that would freeze property tax revenues for cities that cut police budgets, just days after the Austin City Council approved a budget that will cut police funding by up to one-third by moving areas like forensics outside of the management of the police department to become separate municipal offices and by reinvesting money in social services.

BY JUAN PABLO GARNHAM AND JOLIE MCCULLOUGH

These are some of the police department units that were cut or reduced during the budget approval:

  1. 911 Call Center – $17.7 million
  2. Forensic Sciences – $12.7 million
  3. Support Services – $14.1 million 
  4. Community Partnerships – $2.5 million 
  5. Victims Services – $3.1 million 
  6. Internal Affairs – $4.5 million 
  7. Special Investigations – $1.8 million 
  8. Special Events – $4.4 million 
  9. Mounted Patrol – $2.1 million 
  10. Traffic Enforcement – $18.4 million 
  11. Austin Regional Intelligence Center – $2 million 
  12. Park Police – $5.8 million 
  13. Lake Patrol – $1.4 million 
  14. Organized Crime/K-9 – $1.2 million 
  15. Nuisance Abatement – $312,000
  16. Canceling 3 Cadet Classes – $2.2 million this year
  17. Officer Overtime – $2.8 million 
  18. License Plate Readers – $133,000

Would you consider this to be “transformative?” No. Let’s explore some scenarios where these defundings directly impact you.

Scenario 1: You are in a wreck on I-35. Which will impact you? #’s 1, 3, 10, 16 and 17.

Scenario 2: You are driving with your families or friends and a drunk driver speeds through a stop sign. Which will impact you? #’s 1, 3, 10, 15, 16, 18 and 17.

Scenario 3: An intruder is trying to, or has, entered your home. Which will impact you? #’s 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 15, 16, and 17.

Is this okay? Is this the standard we hold for the great city of Austin?…

“Any city in the state of Texas that defunds law enforcement will have their property tax revenue frozen as of that time,” Abbott said in Fort Worth, where the press conference was held. “This will be an effective tool that effectively will prevent cities from being able to reduce funding support for law enforcement agencies. Some cities are more focused on political agendas than public safety,” said Gov. Abbott. “Austin’s decision puts the brave men and women of the Austin Police Department and their families at greater risk, and paves the way for lawlessness. Public safety is job one, and Austin has abandoned that duty. The legislature will take this issue up next session, but in the meantime, the Texas Department of Public Safety will stand in the gap to protect our capital city.”

Gov. Greg Abbott

The choice is yours. Make your voices heard and contact Austin City Council and Gov. Greg Abbott’s office bellow.

City of Austin
Name of Intended Department
ATT: Name of Intended Recipient
2006 East 4th Street
Austin, Texas 78702

Austin City Hall

Address: 301 W. Second St., Austin, Texas 78701

Mayor Stephen Adler512-978-2100
District 1 Council Member Natasha Harper-Madison512-978-2101
District 2 Council Member Delia Garza512-978-2102
District 3 Council Member Sabino “Pio” Renteria512-978-2103
District 4 Council Member Gregorio “Greg” Casar512-978-2104
District 5 Council Member Ann Kitchen512-978-2105
District 6 Council Member Jimmy Flannigan512-978-2106
District 7 Council Member Leslie Pool512-978-2107
District 8 Council Member Paige Ellis512-978-2108
District 9 Council Member Kathie Tovo512-978-2109
District 10 Council Member Alison Alter512-978-2110

Mailing Address:
Texans for Greg Abbott
PO Box 308
Austin, TX 78767

Office of the Governor
State Insurance Building
1100 San Jacinto
Austin, Texas 78701

Office of the Governor
P.O. Box 12428
Austin, Texas 78711-2428

Email Address: Info@GregAbbott.com

Scheduling Requests: Scheduling@GregAbbott.com

Press Inquiries: Press@GregAbbott.com

Telephone

(800) 843-5789 – Information and Referral Hotline (for Texas callers)

(512) 463-1782 – Information and Referral and Opinion Hotline
(for Austin, Texas and out-of-state callers)

(512) 463-2000 – Office of the Governor Main Switchboard
(office hours are 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CST)

Call 711 for Relay Texas – Citizen’s Assistance Telecommunications Device, if you are using a telecommunication device for the deaf (TDD)