South Austin News | SARC

“The Austin Police Department on Friday identified the man who was found dead lying in the road with multiple gunshot wounds early Wednesday morning in South Austin.” CBS AUSTIN

“Commercial developer and operator Unico Properties has sold Bouldin Creek, a 170,000-square-foot office building in South Austin to San Francisco-based DivcoWest for an undisclosed price. Unico Properties developed the five-story building in partnership with Manifold Real Estate and OakPoint Real Estate. Amenities include a 2,500-square-foot coffee shop, rooftop terraces, fitness center and two acres of green space.” REBUSINESS ONLINE

“A popular community garden that serves several hundred people with local produce has stopped distributing to customers.” KXAN

“A person was taken into police custody following a SWAT call at a south Austin office building Wednesday night.” PATCH

“Happy weekend, South Austin! Below, we’ve included some of this week’s top events from around the South Austin area. Here’s a roundup of local events coming up in the area this weekend.” PATCH

“If you’re shopping for a new house, you’ve likely already pored through all the internet listings for your area. And while you may have learned roughly what these houses are like from the photographs, you just can’t beat an in-person encounter with the real thing.” PATCH

South Austin News | SARC

Austin police reported to the 1300 block of Southport Drive at around 11:34 p.m. after witnesses heard gunshots and saw a man on the ground. Officers found the injured man, and despite life-saving measures, he was pronounced dead at 12:06 a.m.KXAN

“Commercial developer and operator Unico Properties has sold Bouldin Creek, a 170,000-square-foot office building in South Austin to San Francisco-based DivcoWest for an undisclosed price. Unico Properties developed the five-story building in partnership with Manifold Real Estate and OakPoint Real Estate. Amenities include a 2,500-square-foot coffee shop, rooftop terraces, fitness center and two acres of green space.” REBUSINESS ONLINE

“If you’ve been wanting to add a four-legged ball of love and affection to your family, start with these South Austin area animal shelters for a pet to take home.” PATCH

“Emergency personnel responded to 2300 block of the West Ben White Boulevard service road around 10 p.m. Sunday, ATCEMS says. The person was “possibly unconscious” according to initial reports. The adult was taken to South Austin Medical Center, ATCEMS says.” KXAN

CALL TO ACTION: Afghan-American Austinite Veteran Seeks Assistance for Family Members

SARC,

We have an opportunity to help someone in need right now.

Here in Austin, there’s an Afghan interpreter named Hash who served alongside our military. He has become a citizen, but his family is currently trapped in Kabul, at Hamid Karzai International Airport. They have been told they will leave in 2 days, but they have no food or water. His 3-year-old child is now beginning to fade in and out of consciousness.

A veteran, and Hash’s sponsor, have reached out to SARC, asking if we can share Hash’s story.

We’ve all seen the images coming out of this emergency, and here is a small but important way we can help someone who risked his life for our soldiers.

He has asked that people contact Austin media to bring attention to this emergency and to see if his family can receive basic supplies.

So South Austin Republicans, we’re asking you to reach out and share this link with the following media outlets:

KVUE

FOX7

KLBJ

KOKE FM

Austin Chronical

Community Impact

Austin American Statesman

Please take a few moments and reach out to one or more of these outlets; a hero’s family is in need, and this is all he’s asked in return. If you have other media outlets to add to our list, please comment below this post.

If the media asks you for additional details, please have them email southaustinrc@gmail.com.

CALL TO ACTION: Afghan-American Austinite Veteran Seeks Assistance for Family Members

South Austin News | SARC

“Melissa France, sales manager of Urban Motorsports, says many of her customers are new to riding electric scooters. But she fears someone will get hurt riding on the stretch of Hether Street near South Lamar Boulevard, where Urban Motorsports is located.” KXAN

“Want to add a furry friend to your family? Look no further than these South Austin animal shelters for a pet available for adoption. Many pound animals are still looking for their forever home and facilities are still working to fulfill adoptions and place pets with families.” PATCH

“Austin police believe Nikolas Eugenio Martinez was stabbed either in his apartment complex’s parking lot or in his car the night of July 23. He called 911 himself, then drove down the road to a gas station for help.” KXAN

“The 16,500-square-foot brewery, called Fast Friends Beer Co., will be located just east of I-35 in South Austin, between William Cannon Drive and Slaughter Lane. Construction recently began at the site. Childress, a West Point graduate and combat veteran who earned an MBA at the University of Texas at Austin, is the founder of Fast Friends. He previously spearheaded Common Space Brewery in Hawthorne, Calif., and TEN20 Craft Brewery in Louisville, Kentucky.” KXAN

“Meanwhile, video captured in South Austin by Varun Prasad showed just how powerful the storm was as heavy rain and winds battered power lines, generating sparks.” SPECTRUM NEWS

“Austin Police said they responded around 5:10 a.m. to a report of a burglary in progress at the fast-food chain located at 1501 Town Creek Drive. When officers arrived on scene, they found a male suspect still inside, robbing the business.” CBS AUSTIN

“Austin firefighters say they believe someone had driven onto the trail and crashed into the water behind the Hyatt Regency Austin on Barton Springs Road. The area where the car drove in is in between South First Street and South Congress Avenue.” KXAN

“Texas is set to legalize medical marijuana for patients with cancer starting September 1st, leaving shop owners in the cannabis industry, preparing to greet new clients.” FOX7 AUSTIN

SOUTH AUSTIN, TX — Here’s your local weather forecast for the coming weekend, as reported by” Darksky via PATCH

“Construction on much of the new 18-acre shopping center located off of Slaughter Lane and Interstate 35 is set to finish by around October. Construction on other buildings within the center will finish later, according to Community Impact.” KVUE

Join South Austin Republican Club Now!

Together We Have Hope | SARC

(iStock)

By Dallas Emerson, SARC Senior Communications Director & Data Analyst

“There’s just no hope.”

How many times have you heard that sentence, while someone sullenly shakes their head? A lot of times that sentiment is followed with, “That’s why I’m moving; this city’s just too crazy.”

I get the sentiment. Austin is growing rapidly, getting more expensive, and frightening more dangerous. I can’t tell you what’s best for you or your family but, I can tell you there is hope. Hope is an odd thing. When you’re without it, you almost guarantee the worst outcome—because everyone stops striving for a positive outcome. When people are without hope for a greater cause, they seek out ways to keep themselves and their loved ones safe. They turn away from the fight; they flee the city. In many ways, conservatives in Austin, remind me of Christian monks as the Roman Empire collapsed. Seeing that the people wouldn’t accept their messages, and watching as society spun down the drain, many monks left the cities for secluded monasteries, retaining knowledge that would have been lost otherwise. But without the monks’ learning and wisdom, society’s spiral accelerated in Rome. Now, we’re not the Roman Empire, and the Vandals aren’t burning everything down. Well unless you were downtown last summer.

But we are in a position where hope is faint—when we see it at all. We can all feel it. The city is on the verge of… something. If the Left continues its previously nearly-unopposed march, then its on the verge of disaster. But it may just be on the verge of a new beginning. If leftism hasn’t yet reached its high-water mark, its certainly approaching it. The City Council finally has a commonsense conservative in Councilwoman McKenzie Kelly. Mayor Adler and far-left Councilman Casar are both term-limited out of their seats at the end of next year. Austinites overwhelmingly supported Proposition B. The Democratic Socialists of America were stunned when dozens and dozens of concerned citizens called into the City Council to demand refunding of our police academy. Our police forces are training new recruits, and while the training may not be the best, we are adding new officers to our rosters for the first time in months.

“I’m a young man (though increasingly less young). I cannot afford to lose hope in the future.”

By Dallas Emerson, SARC Senior Communications Director & Data Analyst

Influential, free-thinking individuals are beginning to flock to Austin, as we see Joe Rogan and Elon Musk choose to move here. We can expect more of that soon. Tesla’s new factory will bring a combination of high-tech and manufacturing to Austin that is certain to be a boom. And if you’re reading this, you’re participating in a new, grassroots movement, to remake Austin. I’m a young man (though increasingly less young). I cannot afford to lose hope in the future. I refuse to believe that our best days are behind us. As our little club has already proven during the police class refunding debate, we have the ability to affect change in our city. So many of us watch the news and see the country sliding into something ugly. We see the city sliding faster. We want to win big, and turn the country around by working for and donating to big, federal office races.

“I’m here to encourage you to do two things; don’t lose hope and fight for your city.”

By Dallas Emerson, SARC Senior Communications Director & Data Analyst

We want to win the country, but we lose the city. I’m here to encourage you to do two things; don’t lose hope and fight for your city. When you board an airplane they tell you in case of emergency, “put your mask on first.” You need to be healthy enough to help those around you. Well, ladies and gentlemen, let’s put our masks (oxygen, not cloth!) on first, fight to make Austin a truly competitive, bi-partisan city, and show the country it can be done.

Together, we have hope.  


Special Club Details here >> @southaustinrc | Linktree

New member sign up text “SARC” to 888-549-0201

More from SARC…

The Silent Patriots | SARC

By Sarah Jessica Fields

This was my view of the Capitol from a hotel room. We were in Austin for several days. I am home now and I am physically and emotionally exhausted. I think that some Americans have a skewed idea of what all patriots look like. When you think of a patriot, you think full battle rattle…. maybe you think about marching, and rallies, and giving public speeches about how we need to stop the left from taking over and stepping all over our constitutional rights. I’m here to tell you, that’s not what all patriots look like all the time.

There are those who are tirelessly banding together in small groups. Visiting representatives and senators offices. Pushing and fighting to have our voices heard. We memorize bill numbers. We memorize language from each bill we want to advocate for, or bills we know are bad news for the American people. We eat crappy food. We skip meals. We walk all day for miles in that capitol building trying to build relationships so we can push good bills through committees and into floor votes. We sleep in the back of our cars. We don’t get paid. And sometimes, we have to sit by ourselves in a private spot of that house so we can get a hold of ourselves because of how much our cause means to us. We are met with evil, and we are many times met with demonic atmospheres. We have trash thrown at us. We have people screaming in our faces because while we may want to protect innocent lives, and protect children, some believe we are “messing with their rights” to teach critical race theory to our children, mutilate children’s body parts and tear down statutes from American history that offends them. And then we come home.

We hug our children. We cry over them because we worry about their future. We go to the grocery store and pick out buckets of grapes that aren’t bruised. We cook dinner and clean our houses. All the while trying to simply decompress from the evils that stood in our paths the whole time we were absent. That is patriotism. That is activism. That is advocacy. Sometimes it’s not all sunshine and rainbows. But it is always valiant. There are some absolutely amazing patriots who work outside these capitol walls. Patriots who rescue men, women and children from sex traffickers. Patriots who fight for our country and place their lives on the line every single day. Patriots who have rallies and spread awareness throughout our beautiful country. I work with some of these amazing people and I am so honored to be in their inner circles.

But please don’t forget, this house is The People’s house. We have people on the inside as well who are advocating for constitutional rights so as to keep The People free from tyranny. This week was a hard one. Many bills that we (Texas Freedom Coalition) worked extremely hard for such as stopping medical child abuse, advocating for constitutional carry and making sure parental rights are prioritized by DFPS, have been killed or are in the process of dying; because of the corruption inside this building. Yet, bills that will invade our freedoms during an emergency, are well and alive. (HB3). But we go home. We take a breath. We rest. We start again. Patriotism has many roles and is seen in many ways. But we all have the same patriotic blood running through our veins. I am honored to be a patriot.

Release: South Austin Republican Club Takes Official Stances on May 1st Propositions

Charter amendment regarding binding arbitration 

Proposition A: Shall the City Charter be amended to give the Austin Firefighters Association, Local 975 of the International Association of Fire Fighters, the authority to require the City to participate in binding arbitration of all issues in dispute with the Association if the City and the Association reach impasse in collective bargaining negotiations? 

Vote: Yes! Given the city’s reckless behavior regarding public safety, protecting the our fire fighters is a necessary step.  

City Code amendment to prohibit certain activities 

Proposition B*: Shall an ordinance be adopted that would create a criminal offense and a penalty for sitting or lying down on a public sidewalk or sleeping outdoors in and near the Downtown area and the area around the University of Texas campus; create a criminal offense and penalty for solicitation, defined as requesting money or another thing of value, at specific hours and locations or for solicitation in a public area that is deemed aggressive in manner; create a criminal offense and penalty for camping in any public area not designated by the Parks and Recreation Department? 

Vote: Yes! Austin has seen an increase in homelessness, in fires, and in crime related to the homeless population. While the city should be working harder to help those in need, “camp anywhere” has failed dismally. 

Charter amendment regarding Director of Police Oversight 

Proposition C: Shall the city charter be amended to allow for a Director of Police Oversight to be appointed or removed in a manner established by City Council ordinance, with duties that include the responsibility to ensure transparency and accountability as it relates to policing? 

Vote: No! The city has cut the police budget and is taking advice from numerous anti-safety groups. Adding another entity to control police activity, and the added bureaucracy that will follow, is unwise.  

Charter amendment to change date of mayoral elections 

Proposition D: Shall the City Charter be amended to transition the election for mayor from gubernatorial election years to presidential election years, providing that the mayor elected in 2022 will serve a 2-year term and then mayoral elections will occur on the same date as presidential elections starting in 2024? 

Vote: No! By moving the elections to presidential elections years, partisanship will only increase in what is supposed to be a nonpartisan race. 

Charter amendment to create ranked choice voting for city elections 

Proposition E: Shall the City Charter be amended to provide for the use of ranked choice voting in city elections, if such voting is permitted by state law? 

Vote: No! Ranked choice voting has bizarre effects and many believe violates the “one citizen, one vote” principle of democracy.  


Charter amendment to change from a council-manager form of government 

Proposition F: Shall the City Charter be amended to change the form of city government from ‘council-manager’ to ‘strong mayor-council,’ which will eliminate the position of professional city manager and designate an elected mayor as the chief administrative and executive officer of the city with veto power over all legislation which includes the budget; and with sole authority to hire and fire most department heads and direct staff; and with no articulated or stated charter authority to require the mayor to implement Council decisions. 

Vote: No! By giving such strong power to the mayor, smaller districts, or districts which voted against the mayor, would have even less power than they currently doing making Austin an even more divided city. 
  
Charter amendment to add a geographic council district 

Proposition G: Shall the City Charter be amended to provide for an additional geographic council district which will result in 11 council members elected from single member districts? 

Vote: No! Without knowing where the district would be added, it would be easy for the current members of the City Council to undercut political opponents.  

Charter amendment to adopt voluntary public campaign finance program 

Proposition H: Shall the City Charter be amended to adopt a public campaign finance program, which requires the city clerk to provide up to two $25 vouchers to every registered voter who may contribute them to candidates for city office who meet the program requirements? 

Vote: No! This program takes taxpayer money and redistributes it. This means that effectively Austin taxpayers would be forced to help fund campaigns they disagree with.  

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On May 1st a Change In Course Must Be Made | SARC

By Dallas Emerson, SARC Deputy Communications Director SARC

The City Council of Austin has failed to address homelessness in the city.  

Think that’s too harsh? Mayor Adler agrees

Don’t misunderstand, he doesn’t have a plan, and doesn’t want to reinstate the camping ban. He doesn’t really have any suggestions. Honestly, it feels a bit like he’s phoning it in at this time, given that can’t run for reelection.  

In June 2019, the Council legalized public camping, stating that the goal was to make the homeless more visible. They got what they wished. You can’t walk downtown without seeing encampments on many streets. You can’t drive along MoPac without seeing tent cities that remind someone of pictures from The Great Depression.  

Many of these encampents leaving people feeling unsafe. And for a good reason, according the Austin Police Chief, who noted a “growing crime trend” 

Despite achieving the goal of increased visibility, the number of homeless per capita hasn’t changed, according to Ending Community Homelessness Coalition (ECHO). If anything, it has gone up. And the number of available shelter beds has actually decreased while the city focuses on developing transitional housing.  

But if the city is changing tactics, why does the situation feel like its getting worse?  

The city allocated about $70,000,000 last year to help provide home and shelters for the homeless. As of December, $30,000,000 was left unspent. Untouched. Unused.  

Frankly, it seems that for some council members, running for Mayor is more important. Defunding the police is a higher priority. Giving the Mayor greater authority over legislations matters more.  

Meanwhile, our city suffers higher crime rates and infrastructure damage as a result of the 10-1 progressive dominated council.  

But laws will not fix the homeless issue.  

This may be a failure of our city’s culture. Certainly, our churches should feel indicted. The presence of large numbers of homeless suggests that something isn’t working. Perhaps we are not charitable enough. Perhaps we are not active enough in helping those in need.  

But it isn’t civil society on the ballot May 1st. We all must decide for ourselves how we will better help our neighbors.  

In the meantime, we must tell the Council that we agree with the Mayor. This hands-off approach has been a failure. Our city is less healthy and less safe than before their June 2019 decision.  

Moving forward I would hope that the city will actually get down to brass tacks and do the hard work of finding solutions to these problems, not merely treating our city as a laboratory for social theory. Allowing people to live—and die—on the streets hasn’t worked. These people need help, not a blind eye. 

I have participated in cleaning up after a camp behind a local VFW was abandoned. It was horrifying. Human waste, garbage, and rotting food were piled high. No one should live in these conditions, and it is a miracle that Austin hasn’t seen an outbreak of avoidable diseases like some of California’s major cities in the past years. 

For the sake of our city, vote yes on Proposition B. Helping the homeless doesn’t end there, but it is how we as citizens can alert our government to what they don’t want to acknowledge—a change in course must be made.  

How We Can Help Our Community

By Dallas Emerson, SARC Deputy Communications Director

SARC has an opportunity to help our community!

One of the issues that brings us most together is the problem of homelessness in our city. This week, I’m sure those without homes will be more present on our minds than usual.
We are about to get hit with an incredible cold front in the coming week, with temperatures falling well below freezing soon. This means hundreds, or thousands, of people will be exposed to dangerous elements.


While we could use this as a moment to point to the failed policies of the City government, there is something much more productive we can do.
There is something we can do to help.
Front Steps, a prominent homeless shelter in Austin, has launched a blanket drive, and is requesting people purchase one of three specific blankets from Amazon and Kohl’s—you can find their list on this page.
Our club has already participated in a park cleanup as a part of our effort to improve the city. This is an opportunity for us to help our city confront one of its most pressing concerns.
As Conservatives, we champion the ability of free and independent people to take care of their communities without government direction.
As Republicans, we have often bemoaned the human cost of the housing situation in our city.
We shouldn’t pitch in to score political points. We should do it because it is right.


As we’ve moved into 2021, community outreach has been one of our foremost goals, and this is a moment where our community needs our outreach.
I encourage all of you—if it is within your means—to please purchase a blanket for Front Steps today. If you are a member of a church or other community group, please take a moment to encourage them to donate as well.
It just may save a life.

The GOP is Divided — and That’s Good

By Dallas Emerson, SARC Deputy Communications Director

The GOP is Divided — and That’s Good — let’s explore…

I’ve noticed a disturbing trend in conservative conversation.
“Let’s start a new party. A party for trueconservatives.”

We’ve all heard some version of that.
The Republican Party is publicly fracturing. As President Trump leaves office, some of his own party are happy to see him go; others see this as the first step in the fall of the Republic.
I confess, I was never fully on board with the President. I opposed him in the primaries. I refused to vote for him in 2016, considering myself something of a Never-Trumper, but eventually decided to vote for him in 2020, fearing the madness of the Left. I have been on both sides of the Trump debate.
I’m here to tell you that if you love Trump or hate Trump, we have to share the party with those we disagree with, and that’s a good thing.

How can I say that? A divided party loses elections. A divided party struggles with messaging. A divided party spends too much energy fighting itself to convert persuadable voters.
Yes, but a party with intellectual diversity has the opportunity to refine ideas. Divisions in the party allow different messages to be brought to different populations and regions. Internal arguments can strengthen the ability to communicate.
True, the Republican Party is, at the moment weaker, for its division between Pro-Trump (the majority) and Anti-Trump (the decided minority).
It may shock you to know that both sides consider the others to have abandoned “true conservatism.” As though there was one version of Conservatism. There have always been differences in our movement—Trump just made them intensely personal.
Remember, the “anti-Trump” wing of the party encompasses moderates like Romney and hardcore Tea Partiers like Sen. Ben Sasse. The Pro-Trump wing has former Democratic moderates like Rep. Van Drew and unquestionable conservatives like Governor DeSantis.

In many ways “pro” and “anti” Trump are better understood as style, rather than policy, differences.

I encourage each and every one of you to consider that the large majority of people you disagree with on the subject of the President came to their opinion in good faith, following their understanding of the facts, and their own upbringing. Try to bring others to understand your ideas all you like; tell them why you think they’re wrong, but please remember we on the Right have a lot more in common than it feels like at the moment.
And we’ve never exactly been a monolithic movement.
Soon, however, the debate within the GOP will move beyond Trump. It has to.
He won’t be President, and Biden, with backed by narrow majorities in the House and Senate will be striving to accomplish everything he can before his political capital is entirely spent.

As a party, we are not going to suddenly come together in unity. Instead, we will return to some version our older arguments: establishment vs. grassroots, nationalist vs. libertarian, intervention vs. isolation. Trumpism is difficult to define, again maybe being a style rather than ideology, but it will be added to our numerous internal disputes.
We’ve had these debates for generations and we’re better for it.
In its founding days, the Republican party argued about how best to combat slavery.
In the Cold War, it was Republicans who sought to strike the appropriate balance of assertiveness and restraint.

The Left has a single answer to all questions that face our society: government. Lots and lots of government intervention.

By remaining the party of argument, the GOP can remain the party of ideas.
So, when you run into another insufferable Never Trumper, and when you encounter another die-hard Trumpist, remember, we’re not a party that revolves around a single man, but around a complex set of ideas.

We need each other, we can’t win without each other, and we’re better off arguing with one another than just sitting around talking about how much we all agree.